Thailand News Update | North Korea shares coding knowledge with Thailand

Another big day for the CCSA, as we hope to see decisions come out to ease current restrictions or make further changes to the Thailand Pass. On the program, the possible removal of the PCR test before arrival, a reduction in the amount of insurance from 20,000 to 10,000 dollars, allowing the official reopening of Thai nightlife and even a possible relaxation of the rules of the face mask. We have a team following all of this today and will be the first to make the announcements when they hit thethaiger.com


After being criticized for its mostly neutral stance on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the government is now drawing criticism over a meeting with another international pariah. A meeting on Wednesday between Thailand’s computer coding committee and the North Korean ambassador drew heavy criticism from Thai netizens. The vice chair of the committee posted about the meeting on her Facebook page, saying the committee met with the diplomats at the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Embassy in Bangkok to discuss collaboration on coding projects. . The Facebook post drew negative comments and has since been deleted. The committee and other authorities met with North Korean Ambassador Kim Je Bong yesterday to discuss coding studies and plans to improve coding knowledge among Thais. coding to encourage learning computer coding in elementary school high school students to keep up with today’s learning standards. Students would first learn critical thinking and problem solving, which are fundamental skills for computer coding.


Thai police have cracked down on the sale and production of fake Covid-19 PCR test results as well as education certificates and other documents needed for overseas jobs. Three people, whom the police suspect of being part of a large network, were arrested for posing as doctors selling the false documents. The Ministry of Health Services Support has received complaints about the sale of fake Covid-19 test results and authorities have found a website offering PCR tests for 890 baht with results within an hour for those who travel abroad. An undercover agent claiming to be a customer contacted the website on the Line messaging app. He was asked to provide his name, age and a date for the lab test result. The test result was delivered within 15 minutes and police said the document was fake. The PCT lab service was named in the document, but the company denied providing it and later filed a complaint with the police over the fraudulent documents. Police said they discovered the network had earned around 300,000 baht from November last year to January from the fake Covid-19 test results scam and earned 5 million baht from selling other forged documents to the during the same period. Officers say the gang also ran another website selling education certificates, such as master’s degrees, with prices ranging from 1,500 baht to 7,000 baht. They also allegedly forged driving licenses, identity cards, car registration documents, land title deeds and license plates. Police have found three suspects between the ages of 22 and 26. to believe that they were medical technology professionals and to arrange to provide or offer services using false documents.


Two antiviral drugs will be added to Thailand’s Covid-19 treatment plan. The Department of Medical Services said the drugs Molnupiravir and Paxlovid have been approved for the treatment of patients with Covid-19 in Thailand. Molnupiravir is intended to treat high-risk groups like the elderly and patients with chronic conditions. Relevant departments are also discussing the use of Paxlovid. The main Covid-19 drug, the antiviral Favipiravir, will be restricted to patients with moderate or severe symptoms only. Department director Somsak Akkasilp said authorities will discuss the distribution and use the details later. There will also be a study on the effectiveness of using Molnupiravir, Paxlovid and Favipiravir to develop a reasonable and effective drug use plan. Recently, authorities shared that home isolation and community isolation would be the main treatment provided to patients with mild symptoms.


The American hamburger fast food chain, Carl’s Jr., is saying goodbye to Thailand. Its six stores in Bangkok and Pattaya will close by the end of the month. The R&R Restaurant Group, which holds the franchise rights to run the Carl’s Jr. chains in Thailand, says it can no longer afford to continue operating. The group says it was forced to use major ingredients only from the United States, adding that CKE Restaurants Holdings, the parent company of Carl’s Jr, had imposed restrictions that simply made the Thai operation very expensive. Over the past year, the company says it tried to stay afloat, but decided to close because it could no longer bear the ongoing operating costs and losses. They told customers in a statement that in addition to the costs of importing ingredients, there was a lack of foreign tourists, an important market for the burger chain. They also noted that, despite the challenges, at least one branch in Bangkok and one in Pattaya were quite popular and successful even during the pandemic. In 2012, the burger franchise launched its first Thai location at Central Festival Pattaya Beach.


Three teenagers are missing after going swimming in a river in the western province of Kanchanaburi after being swept away by the strong current. The teenagers, along with a four-year-old child, were swimming in the Kwai Noi River when they were swept away from shore. A woman jumped into the water and managed to save the four-year-old child. Rescuers are still searching the river for 18-year-old twins and a 15-year-old. Rescuers from Kanchanaburi and villagers from Thong Pha Phum district mobilized yesterday to search for the three teenagers. Lifeguards in wetsuits entered the water to search and a boat was dispatched but the teenagers have not yet been found. Drowning remains the leading cause of death for children under 15 in Thailand.


A spicy som tam seller in Buriram brings in 10,000 sales a day… that’s a lot of som tam. So what’s his thing? Its unique marketing campaign. She posts pictures of herself wearing a bikini top and lingerie while making the spicy papaya salad and posing outside her shop. Her boutique’s sign is even a cartoon of a curvaceous woman, lifting her shirt to reveal her little red bikini. Pookie’s advice to other food vendors is, “if you’ve got it, flaunt it.” Dong Yai Pattana village in Buriram, northeast of Thailand. Pookie’s som tam booth has become so popular that her equally curvy friend has also stepped in to help, not only serving customers but also joining Pookie in her bikini shots to help speed up her marketing campaign. Som Tam
Som Tam sellers in BuriramAt first, Pookie posted a bikini picture in her shop on Facebook and received so much criticism that she lost her confidence and did not open her shop for fear of being reprimanded by local authorities . But everything changed for Pookie once she stopped caring about people’s opinions and opened her shop anyway. Today, Pookie takes 300 calls a day from customers in Buriram and surrounding provinces. Pookie even has a client in Nong Khai, more than a seven-hour drive to the Laos border. Pookie says all she cares about is generating more income for her and her family.

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